Skip to main content

A. Street Design and Access. The design and construction of streets and public improvements shall be in accordance with section 18.4.6.040 Street Design Standards, except as otherwise required for the following facilities within the Croman Mill District. A change in the design of a street in a manner inconsistent with the Croman Mill District Street Design Standards requires a minor amendment in accordance with subsection 18.3.2.030.B.

1. Central Boulevard. The tree-lined boulevards along Siskiyou Boulevard and Ashland Street are an easily identifiable feature of Ashland’s boulevard network. Application of this street design to the central boulevard will create a seamless boulevard loop, linking the Croman Mill District with downtown Ashland. The central boulevard also serves as the front door to the Croman Mill District, creating a positive first impression when entering the district. Options addressing the street configuration and intersection geometry will be evaluated with the final design of the central boulevard. See central boulevard location in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.1.a and street cross section in Figure 18.3.2.060.1.b.

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.1.a. Street Framework

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.1.b. Central Boulevard

2. Phased Street Plan. Build-out of the central boulevard can be accommodated through a phased development plan.

a. Phase I implementation will require the following.

i. Maintain the existing Mistletoe Road alignment from Tolman Creek Road to the northwest corner of the Croman Mill site as illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.2.a.i.

Figure 18.3.2.060.2.a.i. Phase I Central Boulevard

iiInclude developer-constructed minor improvements to the existing portion of Mistletoe Road such as a minimum six-foot wide sidewalk on the north side of the street, two 11-foot travel lanes and the addition of a left-turn pocket at the intersection with Tolman Creek Road.

iiiA developer-constructed three-lane central boulevard from the northwest corner of the district to Siskiyou Boulevard.

b. Phase II implementation will require the following. See Figure 18.3.2.060.2.b.

Figure 18.3.2.060.2.b. Phase II Central Boulevard Alternatives

i. Options addressing the street configuration and intersection geometry will be evaluated with the final design of the central boulevard. Final street configuration may involve a modification in the central boulevard cross section (e.g., delete on-street parking lanes) to address limitations to right-of-way width (e.g., existing buildings).

ii. The alternative central boulevard location and realignment of Tolman Creek Road is contingent upon property owner’s consent, and future sale and relocation of the existing ODOT maintenance yard.

3. Tolman Creek Road Realignment. Additional traffic will be generated by the redevelopment of the Croman Mill District. The alternative central boulevard location includes the realignment of Tolman Creek Road with the central boulevard to discourage non-local through traffic in the Tolman Creek neighborhood and in the Bellview School area as illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.3.a and Figure 18.3.2.060.A.3.b. The modifications to the street network will preserve neighborhood character and address impacts to the neighborhood by directing traffic away from the neighborhood and Bellview School, and toward the Croman Mill District while maintaining access to Tolman Creek Road for neighborhood-generated trips as illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.3.c. Key elements of the realigned Tolman Creek Road include the following.

a. Two through traffic lanes and a northbound turn lane.

b. New traffic signal.

c. Bike lanes.

d. Sidewalks separated from auto traffic by landscaping and canopy trees.

e. Landscaped neighborhood gateway.

f. Evaluation of the intersection alignment of local streets with Tolman Creek Road including Takelma Way, Grizzly Drive and Nova Drive.

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.3.a. Central Boulevard Alternative

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.3.b. Tolman Creek Road Realignment

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.3.c. Neighborhood Center

4. Local Commercial Streets. Local commercial streets provide district circulation to and from employment uses, the Central Park, and the neighborhood center. See Local Commercial Street locations illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.4.a and the street cross section in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.4.b.

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.4.a. Street Framework

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.4.b. Local Commercial Street

5. Protected Bike Lane. The protected bike lane runs parallel to the central boulevard and connects with the City’s existing Central Bike Path in two locations – adjacent to the Central Park and at the neighborhood center as illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.5.a. The design of the protected bike lane should include the following elements, as illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.5.b.

a. A grade-separated two-way colored bicycle lane buffered from on-street parking by landscaping.

b. A sidewalk separated from the bicycle lane by striping, bollard, grade separation or other treatments.

c. Tabled intersections.

d. Elimination of auto right turns on red at intersections.

e. Incorporate rumble strips along the bike lane at the approaches to all intersections.

f. Signage, lighting or other treatments to alert drivers, pedestrians, and riders approaching intersections.

g. Consideration of a bikes-only signal phase at signalized intersections.

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.5.a. Pedestrian and Bicycle Framework

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.5.b. Protected Bike Lane

6. Multi-Use Paths. The multi-use paths provide pedestrian and bicycle connections between the district and adjacent neighborhood, employment, and commercial areas as illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.6.a. The plan includes extension of the Central Bike Path and establishment of the Hamilton Creek Greenway trail. The Central Bike Path extends the existing multi-use path along the southern edge of the CORP rail line within a 20-foot wide dedicated easement (see Figure 18.3.2.060.A.6.b and serves as a viable commuter route and link to the downtown. The Hamilton Creek Greenway trail provides access to the neighborhood center and an east/west connection across the creek. See the multi-use path and Central Bike Path cross sections in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.6.c, Figure 18.3.2.060.A.6.d, and Figure 18.3.2.060.A.6.e.

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.6.a. Multi-Use Paths

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.6.b. Central Bike Path

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.6.c. Multi-Use Path

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.6.d. Central Bike Path

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.6.e. Central Bike Path at Accessway

7. Accessways. Accessways are intended to balance circulation needs of pedestrians, bicycles, and vehicular access, and to preserve the grid that encourages development of a form that is of human scale and proportion. Accessways connect the central boulevard to the Central Bike Path and allow for shared bicycle, travel lanes, optional on-street parking, and temporary loading zones as necessary to serve development sites. See accessway locations in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.7.a and cross sections in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.7.b, and Figure 18.3.2.060.A.7.c.

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.7.a. Street Framework

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.7.b. Accessway: Multi-Use Path Option

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.7.c. Accessway: Full Street Option

8. Limited Auto Access Streets. Developments abutting the central boulevard and the Central Park shall not have curb cuts through the sidewalk and the protected bike lane on the limited auto access streets. See Figure 18.3.2.060.A.8 for locations of limited auto access streets. A modification of a driveway access location in a manner inconsistent with the Croman Mill District Standards requires a minor amendment in accordance with subsection 18.3.2.030.B.

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.8. Limited Auto Access Streets

9. Access – General Standards. Street and driveway access points in the Croman zones shall be limited to the following.

a. Distance Between Driveways

On Collector Streets – 75 feet

On Local Streets and Accessways – 50 feet

b. Distance from Intersections

On Collector Streets – 50 feet

On Local Streets and Accessways – 35 feet

10. Shared Access. All lots shall provide a shared driveway aisle to abutting parking areas that is at least 20 feet in width. The applicant shall grant a common access easement across the lot. If the site is served by a shared access or alley, access for motor vehicles must be from the shared access or alley and not from the street frontage.

11. On-Street Parking. On-street parallel parking may be required along the central boulevard and local streets as illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.A.10. If on-street parking is required on streets identified on the On-Street Parking map, angled parking and loading zones are prohibited on these streets. Options addressing the street configuration will be evaluated with the final design of the streets identified on the On-Street Parking map.

Figure 18.3.2.060.A.10. On-Street Parking

B. Site and Building Design Standards. The Croman Mill District Design Standards provide specific requirements for the physical orientation, uses, and arrangement of buildings; the management of parking; and access to development parcels. Development located in the Croman Mill District shall be designed and constructed consistent with the following design standards. Additional design standards apply and are specified for developments located adjacent to an active edge street, or that are located within the NC, MU, and OE zones. A site layout, landscaping, or building design in a manner inconsistent with the Croman Mill District Design Standards requires a minor amendment in accordance with subsection 18.3.2.030.B.

1. Building Orientation and Scale – General Requirements. The following standards apply to all buildings, except the Staff Advisor may waive one or more of the following where a building is not adjacent to an active edge street and is not accessed by pedestrians, such as warehouses and industrial buildings without attached offices.

a. Buildings shall have their primary orientation toward the street rather than the parking area. Building entrances shall be oriented toward the street and shall be accessed from a public sidewalk.

b. All front doors must face streets and walkways. Where buildings are located on a corner lot, the entrance shall be oriented toward the higher order street or to the lot corner at the intersection of the streets.

d. Buildings on corner lots shall be located as close to the intersection corner as practicable.

e. Public sidewalks shall be provided adjacent to a public street along the street frontage.

f. Building entrances shall be located within ten feet of the public right of way to which they are required to be oriented. Exceptions may be granted for topographic constraints, lot configuration, designs where a greater setback results in an improved access or for sites with multiple buildings where this standard is met by other buildings. The entrance shall be designed to be clearly visible, functional, and shall be open to the public during all business hours.

g. Automobile circulation or parking shall not be allowed between the building and the right-of-way.

h. Buildings shall incorporate lighting and changes in mass, surface or finish giving emphasis to entrances.

2. Building Orientation and Scale – Additional Requirements Adjacent to Active Edge Street or Within NC, MU or OE Zones. Where development is adjacent to an active edge street as illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.B.2 or is within a NC, MU or OE zones, it shall conform to all of the following standards.

Figure 18.3.2.060.B.2. Active Edge Streets

a. Buildings shall be setback not more than ten feet from a public sidewalk unless addition setback area is used for pedestrian entries, such as alcoves, or for pedestrian activities such as plazas or outside eating areas. This standard shall apply to both street frontages on corner lots. If more than one structure is proposed for a site, at least 65 percent of the aggregate building frontage shall be within ten feet of the sidewalk.

b. Building frontages greater than 100 feet in length shall have offsets, jogs or have other distinctive changes in the building façade.

c. Buildings shall incorporate arcades, roofs, alcoves, porticoes, and awnings that protect pedestrians from the rain and sun.

d. Buildings shall incorporate display areas, windows, and doorways as follows. Windows must allow view into working areas or lobbies, pedestrian entrances, or displays areas. Blank walls within 30 feet of the street are prohibited.

e. At least 50 percent of the first-floor façade is comprised of transparent openings (clear glass) between three and eight feet above grade.

3. Building Orientation for Within the NC, MU, and OE Zones, and Not Adjacent to an Active Edge Street. Any wall that is within 30 feet of the street, plaza or other public open space shall contain at least 20 percent of the wall area facing the street in display areas, windows, or doorways. Up to 40 percent of the length of the building perimeter can be exempted for this standard if oriented toward loading or service areas.

4. Parking Areas and On-Site Circulation. Except as otherwise required by this chapter, automobile parking, loading, and circulation areas shall comply with the requirements of chapter part 18.4 Site Development and Design Standards and the following standards.

a. Primary parking areas shall be located behind buildings with limited parking on one side of the building, except that parking shall be located behind buildings only where development is adjacent to an active edge street or is within a NC, MU or OE zone.

b. Parking areas shall be shaded by deciduous trees, buffered from adjacent non-residential uses and screened from non-residential uses.

c. Maximum On-Site Surface Parking. After a parking management strategy for the Croman Mill District is in place, a maximum of 50 percent of the required off-street parking can be constructed as surface parking on any development site. The remaining parking requirement can be met through one or a combination of the credits for automobile parking in chapter 18.4.3 Parking, Access, and Circulation.

5. Streetscapes. One street tree chosen from the street tree list shall be placed for each 30 feet of frontage for that portion of the development fronting the street. Street trees shall meet the standards of section 18.4.4.030 Landscaping and Screening. Developments adjacent to active edge streets, or within NC, MU, and OE zones shall utilize hardscape (paving material) to designate people areas. Sample materials could be unit masonry, scored and colored concrete, pavers, or combinations of these materials.

6. Building Materials. Buildings may not incorporate glass as a majority of the building skin, and bright or neon paint colors used extensively to attract attention to the building or use are prohibited.

7. Building Height Standards. All buildings shall have a minimum height, as indicated in the Building Height Requirements map and Table 18.3.2.050 Croman Mill Dimensional Standards, and shall not exceed the maximum height standards in that table, except as approved under subsection 18.3.2.060.C.

a. Street Wall Height. Maximum street wall façade height for the Croman Mill District for all structures located outside the Residential Buffer Zone is 50 feet.

b. Upperfloor Setback. Buildings taller than 50 feet must step back upper stories, beginning with the fourth story, by at least six feet measured from the façade of the street wall facing the street, alleyway, public park or open space.

c. Residential Buffer Zone. All buildings in the Croman Mill District within the Residential Buffer Zone (see Figure 18.3.2.060.B.7.c) shall meet the following height standards.

Figure 18.3.2.060.B.7.c. Residential Buffer Zone

i. Maximum Height. The maximum height allowance without a performance standards bonus for all structures within the Residential Buffer Zone is 35 feet in the NC zone and 40 feet in the MU zone, and the maximum height with a bonus is 40 feet in accordance with subsection 18.3.2.060.C.13.

ii. Upper Floor Setback Requirements. Buildings taller than two stories must step back the third story by at least six feet measured from the façade facing the street, alleyway, public park or open space.

8. Design of Large-Scale Buildings. For buildings located adjacent to active edge streets, or within NC, MU, and OE Zones, the following architectural standards apply to buildings with a gross floor area greater than 10,000 square feet, a façade length in excess of 100 feet, or a height taller than 45 feet.

a. On upper floors, use windows and/or architectural features that provide interest on all four sides of the building.

b. Use recesses and projections to visually divide building surfaces into smaller scale elements.

c. Use color or materials to visually reduce the size, bulk, and scale of the building.

d. Divide large building masses into heights and sizes that relate to human scale by incorporating changes in building masses or direction, sheltering roofs, a distinct pattern of divisions on surfaces, windows, trees, and small scale lighting.

e. On-site circulation systems shall incorporate a streetscape containing curbs, sidewalks, pedestrian-scale light standards and street trees.

9. Landscaping. In addition to the requirements of chapter 18.4.4 Landscaping, Lighting, and Screening, development shall conform to the following standards.

a. Efforts shall be made to save as many existing healthy trees and shrubs on the site as possible.

b. Landscaping design shall utilize a variety of low water use deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, and flowering plant species as described in subsection 18.4.4.030.I.

c. For developments in the CI zone and not adjacent to an active edge street, buildings adjacent to streets shall be buffered by landscaped areas at least ten feet in width, unless the area is used for entry features such as alcoves or as hardscape areas for pedestrian activities such as plazas or outside eating areas.

d. Loading facilities shall be screened and buffered when adjacent to residentially zoned land.

e. Landscaping shall be designed so that 50 percent coverage occurs after one year and 90 percent coverage occurs after five years.

f. Irrigation systems shall be installed to ensure landscaping success.

10. Lighting. Development shall provide adequate lighting, including pedestrian-scale lighting not greater than 14 feet in height along pedestrian pathways. All lighting shall conform to section 18.4.4.050 Outdoor Lighting.

11. Screening Mechanical Equipment. In addition to meeting the requirements of chapter 18.4.4 Landscaping, Lighting, and Screening all development shall conform to the following standards.

a. Screen rooftop mechanical equipment from public rights-of-way or adjacent residentially zoned property through extended parapets or other roof forms that are integrated into the overall composition of the building.

b. Parapets may be erected up to five feet above the height limit specified in the district in accordance with section 18.3.2.050 Dimensional Standards.

c. Screen ground floor mechanical equipment from public rights-of-way and adjacent residentially zoned property.

d. Solar energy systems are exempt from the screening requirements in subsections 18.3.2.060.B.11.a and 18.3.2.060.B.11.c, above. Additionally, rooftop solar energy systems may be erected up to five feet above the calculated building height, and shall be no greater than five feet above the height limit specified in the district in accordance Table 18.3.2.050 Dimensional Standards.

e. Installation of mechanical equipment requires Site Design Review approval, unless otherwise exempted per chapter 18.5.2 Site Design Review.

12. Transit Facilities Standards. The location of planned transit routes within the Croman Mill District shall be defined according to the Croman Mill District Transit Framework map (see Figure 18.3.2.060.B.12) in collaboration with the local transit authority. Transit service facilities such as planned bus rapid transit facilities, shelters, and pullouts shall be integrated into the development application consistent with the following standards.

Figure 18.3.2.060.B.12. Transit Framework

a. All large scale development located on an existing or planned transit route shall accommodate a transit stop and other associated transit facilities unless the Community Development Director determines that adequate transit facilities already exist to serve the needs of the development; or

b. Provide the City with a bond or other suitable collateral ensuring satisfactory completion of the transit facilities at the time transit service is provided to the development. Suitable collateral may be in the form of security interest, letters of credit, certificates of deposit, cash bonds, bonds or other suitable collateral as determined by the City Administrator.

13. Freight Rail Spur Easement – CI zone.

a. A Rail Spur easement a minimum of 500 feet in length by 25 feet in width shall be set aside at the approximate location in the Transit Framework Map in Figure 18.3.2.060.B.12 (see also, easement area in Figure 18.3.2.060.B.13.a).

Figure 18.3.2.060.B.13.a. Freight Rail Spur

b. No buildings or permanent structures can be established within the spur easement so not to preclude installation of a rail spur for freight loading and unloading.

c. Buildings adjacent to the reserve strip shall be designed and configured to permit loading and unloading.

14. Commuter Rail Platform Easement – NC Zone.

a. A commuter rail platform easement or designated railroad right-of-way a minimum of 400 feet in length and 25 feet in width shall be set aside at the approximate location presented on the Transit Framework map (see also, easement area in Figure 18.3.2.060.B.14.a).

Figure 18.3.2.060.B.14.a. Transit Center

b. No building or permanent structure shall be placed within the platform easement or in such a way as to preclude installation of a commuter rail platform or planned bus rapid transit facility.

c. Buildings adjacent to the reserve strip shall be designed and configured to permit loading and unloading.

15. Transit Plaza. A location for the transit plaza shall be reserved between the commuter rail platform and commercial uses along the central boulevard. The design of the plaza as illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.B.15 shall include the following elements.

a. A passenger waiting, loading, and unloading area.

b. Outdoor gathering space adjacent to commercial uses.

c. Accommodate the central bike path.

d. Conveniently located and secure bike parking.

Figure 18.3.2.060.B.15. Transit Plaza

16. Open Spaces – Central Park. The purpose of the central park is to serve as a public amenity and accommodate the daily needs of employees (e.g., breaks, lunch time) as well as for special events that will attract residents citywide. The central park design as illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.B.16 shall provide a minimum of the following elements.

Figure 18.3.2.060.B.16. Central Park

a. Circulation through and around the park.

b. A centrally located hardscape area to accommodate large gatherings, and of no more than 50 percent of the total park area.

c. Street furniture, including lighting, benches, low walls, and trash receptacles along walkways and the park perimeter.

d. Simple and durable materials.

e. Trees and landscaping that provide visual interest with a diversity of plant materials.

f. Irregular placement of large-canopy trees within passive areas adjacent to the central boulevard.

g. Eight-foot minimum sidewalk width and seven-foot minimum park row width.

h. Landscaped swales to capture and treat runoff.

i. Porous solid surfacing for at least 50 percent of the hardscape area, and paving materials that reduce heat absorption (Solar Reflective Index (SRI) of at least 29).

17. Compact Development. New development shall provide a compact development pattern. This standard is met where the site layout enables future intensification of development and changes to land use over time, as applicable. The following measures shall be used to demonstrate compliance with this standard.

a. The development achieves the required minimum floor area ratio (FAR) and minimum number of stories, or shall provide a shadow plan that demonstrates how development may be intensified over time for more efficient use of land and to meet the required FAR and minimum number of stories.

b. Opportunities for shared parking are utilized.

C. Green Development Standards. The Croman Mill District Green Development Standards provide specific requirements for the management of stormwater run-off, use and collection of recycled materials, solar orientation and building shading, and conserving natural areas. Development located in the Croman Mill District shall be designed and constructed consistent with the following Green Development Standards. A site layout, landscaping, or building design in a manner inconsistent with the Croman Mill District Green Development Standards requires a minor amendment in accordance with subsection 18.3.2.030.B.

1. Conserve Natural Areas. Development plans shall preserve water quality, natural hydrology, and habitat, and preserve biodiversity through protection of streams and wetlands. In addition to the requirements of chapter 18.3.11 Water Resources Overlay, conserving natural water systems shall be considered in the site design through application of the following standards.

a. Designated stream and wetland protection areas shall be considered positive design elements and incorporated in the overall design of a given project.

b. Native riparian plant materials shall be planted in and adjacent to the creek to enhance habitat.

c. Create a long-term management plan for on-site wetlands, streams, associated habitats, and their buffers.

2. Create Diverse Neighborhoods. Development plans shall use the following measures to encourage diversity in the district by providing a balanced range of housing types that compliment a variety of land uses and employment opportunities.

a. Differentiate units by size and number of bedrooms.

b. For developments including more than four dwelling units, at least 25 percent of the total units shall be designated as rental units.

c. Affordable purchase housing provided in accordance with the standards established by section 18.2.5.050 Affordable Housing Standards for households earning at or below 80 percent of the area median income shall apply toward the required percentage of rental housing per subsection 18.3.2.060.C.2.b, above.

d. Units designated as market rate or affordable rental units shall be retained as one condominium tract under one ownership.

3. Design Green Streets. Development plans shall conform to the following standards for green streets.

a. New streets shall be developed to capture and treat stormwater in a manner consistent with the Croman Mill District Stormwater Management Plan map, the Ashland Stormwater Master Plan and Green Streets Standards.

b. All development served by planned green streets shall accommodate said facilities by including the same in the development plan; and/or provide the City with a bond or other suitable collateral ensuring satisfactory completion of the green street(s) at the time full street network improvements are provided to serve the development. Suitable collateral may be in the form of security interest, letters of credit, certificates of deposit, cash bonds, bonds or other suitable collateral as determined by the City Administrator. See locations of green streets illustrated in Figure 18.3.2.060.C.3.b.i and the street cross section in Figure 18.3.2.060.C.3.b.ii.

Figure 18.3.2.060.C.3.b.i. Stormwater Management Plan

Figure 18.3.2.060.C.3.b.ii. Green Streets

4. Design Green Surface Parking. Development shall minimize the adverse environmental and microclimatic impacts of parking lots by using a maximum of 25 percent of the project area for surface parking. Parking areas shall conform to the standards of chapter 18.4.3 Parking, Access, and Circulation, chapter 18.4.4 Landscaping, Lighting, and Screening, and the applicable provisions of this chapter.

5. Stormwater Management. Development shall reduce the public infrastructure costs and adverse environmental effects of stormwater run-off by managing run-off from building roofs, driveways, parking areas, sidewalks, and other hard surfaces through implementation of the following standards.

a. Design grading and site plans to capture and slow runoff.

b. Use porous solid surfaces that allow water to infiltrate the soil.

c. Direct discharge storm water runoff into a designated green street and neighborhood storm water treatment facilities.

d. Retain rainfall on-site through infiltration, evapotranspiration or through capture and reuse techniques.

6. Recycling Areas. All developments in the Croman Mill District shall provide an opportunity-to-recycle site for use of the project occupants, pursuant to the following standards.

a. Non-residential development shall provide a site to accommodate materials collected by the local solid waste franchisee under its on-route collection program for purposes of recycling that is of equal or greater size and with access comparable to the solid waste receptacle.

b. All newly constructed residential units, either as part of an existing development or as a new development, shall provide an opportunity-to-recycle site in accord with the following standards.

i. Residential developments not sharing a common solid waste receptacle shall provide an individual curbside-recycling container for each dwelling unit in the development.

ii. Residential developments sharing a common solid waste receptacle shall provide a site to accommodate materials collected by the local solid waste franchisee under its on-route collection program for purposes of recycling that is of equal or greater size and with access comparable to the solid waste receptacle.

c. Both opportunity-to-recycle sites and common solid waste receptacles shall be screened by fencing or landscaping, such as to limit the view of such facilities from adjacent properties or public rights-of-way. Such screening shall consist of placement of a solid wood, metal, or masonry wall from five to eight feet in height. All refuse and recycle materials shall be contained within the refuse area.

7. Minimize Construction Impacts. Construction activity shall minimize pollution and waste generation through the following measures.

a. Develop and implement an erosion and sediment control plan to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation, and airborne dust generation in accordance with Ashland Public Works Standards. The erosion and sediment control plan shall be submitted with the final engineering for public improvements and building permits.

b. Recycle and/or salvage non-hazardous construction and demolition debris in accordance with the Building Demolition Debris Diversion requirements in 15.04.216.C.

8. Potable Water Reduction for Irrigation. Development plans shall provide water-efficient landscape irrigation designs that reduces the use of potable water by at least 50 percent of the baseline. See definition of baseline under water conserving landscaping in 18.6. Landscape and irrigation design, along with irrigation schedules shall conform to subsection 18.4.4.030.I. Methods used to accomplish the requirements of this section may include, but are not limited to, plant species selection, irrigation efficiency, proper scheduling, and use of captured rainwater, recycled water, graywater, and/or water treated for irrigation purposes and conveyed by a water district or public utility.

9. Solar Orientation. In addition to complying with the applicable provisions of subsection 18.3.2.060.B Site and Building Design, development plans shall incorporate passive and active solar strategies in the design and orientation of buildings and public spaces. When site and location permit, orient the building with the long sides facing north and south.

10. Building Shading. In order to promote energy conservation, development plans shall incorporate shade features as follows.

a. Provide horizontal exterior shading devices for south-facing windows to control solar gain during the peak cooling season.

b. Provide vertical exterior shading devices for east- and west-facing windows to control solar gain and glare due to low sun angles during the peak-cooling season.

c. A combination of horizontal and vertical exterior shading devices may be necessary to control solar gain on southwest- and southeast-facing windows.

11. Recycled Content in Infrastructure. For new streets, driveways, parking lots, sidewalks, and curbs, the aggregate materials shall be at least 50 percent by volume recycled aggregate materials such as crushed Portland cement concrete and asphalt concrete. Above-ground structured parking and underground parking are exempt from this requirement.

12. Outdoor Lighting. Outdoor lighting, in addition to complying with section 18.4.4.050 Outdoor Lighting, shall use down-shielded light fixtures that do not allow light to emit above the 90-degree plane of the fixture. Lighting fixtures provided to implement Federal Aviation Administration mitigation measures to enhance safe air navigation are exempt from this standard.

13. Performance Standard Bonuses. The permitted building height or base residential density, whichever is applicable, shall be increased by the number of stories or percentage residential density as outlined below. In no case shall the building height or residential density exceed the height and density bonus maximums in the Table 18.3.2.050 Croman Mill Dimensional Standards.

a. Green Building Bonus. Projects that achieve a high performance green building standard and significantly improve energy performance beyond the current minimum Oregon requirements are eligible for a building height bonus as follows.

i. In the event that a building or structure is determined to be meet the standard for LEED® certified building, the building height may exceed the maximum height specified for the CM zones within the Table 18.3.2.050 Dimensional Standards, through application of a height bonus as follows.

AA building obtaining LEED® certification as meeting the LEED® Silver Standard may be increased in height by up to one story.

BA building obtaining LEED® certification as meeting the LEED® Gold Standard may be increased in height by up to two stories.

CA building in the Residential Buffer overlay obtaining LEED® certification as meeting the LEED® Silver or Gold Standard may be increased in height by ½ story up to a maximum height of 40 feet.

DApplications to increase the building height in excess of the maximum permitted height through the application of a height bonus shall address any conditional determination by the Federal Aviation Administration requesting air navigation safety mitigation measures.

ii. Demonstration of Achieving LEED® Certification. Projects awarded a height bonus pursuant to this section, shall provide the City with satisfactory evidence of having completed the following steps in the process toward demonstrating achievement of LEED® certification.

AHiring and retaining a LEED® accredited professional as part of the project team throughout design and construction of the project.

BDevelopments seeking a height bonus shall provide documentation with the planning application, and prior to issuance of a building permit, that the proposed development as designed and constructed will meet or exceed the equivalent LEED® standard relating to the height bonus awarded.

CA final report shall be prepared by the LEED® accredited professional and presented to the City upon completion of the project verifying that the project has met, or exceeded, the LEED® standard relating to the height bonus awarded.

DThe report shall produce a LEED® compliant energy model following the methodology outlined in the LEED® rating system. The energy analysis done for the building performance rating method shall include all energy costs associated with the building project.

b. Structured Parking Bonus. A building may be increased by up to one story in height when the corresponding required parking is accommodated underground or within a private structured parking facility, subject to building height limitations for the zoning district.

c. Affordable Housing Bonus.

iFor every percent of units that are affordable, an equivalent percentage of density bonus shall be allowed up to a maximum bonus of 100 percent.

iiAffordable housing bonus shall be for residential units that are affordable for moderate-income persons in accordance with the standards established by section 18.2.5.050 Affordable Housing Standards, and guaranteed affordable through procedures contained therein.

14. Employment Density. To promote transit supportive development, efficient use of employment zoned lands and local economic vitality, it is recommended that developments within the Croman Mill District are planned to accommodate employment densities as follows.

a60 employees per acre in the OE zone.

b25 employees per acre in the CI zone.

c25 employees per acre in the MU zone.

d20 employees per acre in the NC zone.

Loading…